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Vision is an ongoing act of perceiving, processing, and performing. Our vision system answers the questions answers the questions: Where am I? Where is it? What is it? What do I do with it? Learning to answer these questions is an integral part of the Vision Learning Process. Can you imagine how difficult learning would be if you do not understand what you see?

Children and adults with vision problems see the world in a piece meal or fragmented manner. Fragmented performance includes reading with frequent pauses, and writing with poor and inconsistent letter sizes. Without good visual learning skills, a child/adult will not learn how to grasp information effortlessly and automatically from a printed page. Children get confused with words when they do not look the way they sound or sound the way they look because they lack visualization skills.

Vision perception is the process of interpreting and organizing visual information and has two categories: visual discrimination and visual perception. While visual discrimination involves a person’s ability to identify an object’s features, visual perception is their ability to remember that visual image and recreate it in their head. By strengthening these skills, we are able to give children a in-depth understanding of abstract ideas and mathematical concepts.

Most children have to work harder to store information using rote memory since they have trouble translating words into bigger pictures and meanings. Translation is difficult since they are not able to process visual information in a continuous and effortless manner.

When the correct steps are taken to improve visual competency, a struggling child is transformed into an individual who can control their impulses, organize space, organize their own thoughts, and appropriately direct, and monitor performance, e.g read fluently and compute math problems. The key aspect of vision perception is to teach these individuals how to learn visually and to trust what they are seeing.

By performing activities that aim to expand visual fields, children are able to take in a greater amount of information and will feel comfortable in physical space. This will also increase a child’s level of attention, academic, and social skills.

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Testimonial

“I have seen so much growth in Kayla.  She appears much less frustrated and seems more able to cope with frustrating situations.  Last year she could not connect the dots to make a triangle to now being able to draw and microscope and it's parts from the board.  She enjoys reading now and is doing adult connect the dot books.  We used to spend hours on homework which was often not done correctly--to going to school all day and then math tutoring for an hour with no problems.  She still struggles with reading and spelling, but on her last report card got all A's and 1B.  She feels that the vision therapy has helped her be more successful in life (softball, school, etc).  My personnel feeling is that Kayla's vision problems created a feeling of chaos or loss of control---she struggled with trying to control her life in a chaotic situation.  Now she can make sense of the world visually, she is less angry, less stressed and feels more successful in life. Thank you for everything!”

Dr. Camille Reineke PhD Pyschologist

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